Archive for May, 2018

Make Memphis Great

Monday, May 28th, 2018

May 29, 2018

Make Memphis Great

What is great about Memphis?

It is a beautiful city with wonderful trees and flowers.

I has wonderful weather. Many believe that because it is built on a series of bluffs along the river, that most of the bad weather goes north or south of the City.

It has a treasure trove of drinkable pure water.

It has a relativity low cost of living compared to many comparably sized cities in Tennessee and especially nationwide.

It has good local healthcare facilities including a fabulous St Jude cancer facility.

Then what is keeping Memphis from being better?

A larger than normal poverty level caused by a lack of qualified and trained workers for better than minimum wage jobs that require certain skills. These better paying jobs are available but are going unfilled.

An educational system that separates students into those that can afford private education schools with good outcomes and those forced into public education with poor outcomes.

A lack of the traditional family structure based on a two-parent home with values taught at home and in traditional churches. This previously prevalent and proven successful family and church structure has been destroyed by years of failed government poverty programs that encourage welfare dependence and lack of initiative.

Local crime encouraged by gangs and drug culture.

How can we change the above? We encourage your input, suggestions and debate.

Open The Purchasing Records

Tuesday, May 15th, 2018

Open The Purchasing Records

May 15, 2018

There was an interesting article in the CA entitled “Memphis has lost focus”. The article went on to quote the Chairman of the Memphis City Council, Berlin Boyd, saying “We can’t continue down this path and expect a different result”. Also Richard Smith of Federal Express and Chamber of Commerce chairman, demand that elected leaders gut or fix the city/county EDGE board. The EDGE board is well known for handing out tax freezes for various businesses. The Edge board also has rules for minority vendor participation for any EDGE granted pilot. The article stated that Mr. Smith urged the end of minority spending rules.

 

Concerning EDGE minority spending rules the article stated that Boyd said that the biggest beneficiary of the minority spending rules is white women. Assailed by critics, Boyd and Smith agreed to keep the spending rules in place.

 

I have railed against this minority spending requirement for several years. I am not against economically disadvantaged minorities getting a leg up. However what should be changed is the following.

 

The paperwork and legal qualification rules are very complicated and discourage otherwise qualified firms. There should be a common-sense method such as the better business bureau or other independent organization that gives a rating system based on customer satisfaction reports.

 

Most importantly the purchasing system should be open and transparent with the final bids and selection on line and open to all. If a minority firm is the low bidder, so be it. If it is not the low bidder and is selected, then the price differential should be no more than 3% to 5% and then the minority firm should be given a one to two year time to graduate to a no price differential status for future competitive bids.

 

The system now is not transparent and we do not know what minority spending rules are costing us and we do not know who are the beneficiaries.

 

 

 

 

Real World Workforce Development

Saturday, May 5th, 2018

May 2, 2018

 

There was a recent article in the CA titled “Putting a new sprout on technical education”. The article went on to talk about a new Shelby County School Program that will cost $8 million dollars. The article went on to say students will learn hands on skills that lead to an industry certification. This program is part of a massive overhaul of the Shelby County School’s offerings for career and technical education. District leaders say it’s an effort to increase the number of students earning a work certificate before they graduate high school and aligning programs to high-need and high-paying jobs in Memphis. The article talks about various Workforce Development programs which do not seem to produce the trained students for the good paying jobs available. For instance Bolton is adding an agricultural science, technology, engineering and math program, shortened to “agri-STEM.” Students will learn hands-on skills that lead to an industry certification, like flying a drone to survey crops with technology that maps where more water or fertilizer is needed. This sounds high tech and sexy but are these jobs out there in abundance?

 

 

I remember going into the old Memphis School system building and seeing the prominent sign saying, “Every Day, Every Child, College Bound”.

 

 

Now consider that the State of Tennessee funds tuition free education at SW Tennessee Community College for high school graduates funded by over $50 million with a below 10% graduation rate basically for low skilled job training.

 

In this election year we need a candidate for governor who will allow the Tennessee Promise program to pay tuition not only for SW Tennessee Community College but for other non-profit training programs that have a proven record of over 80% graduation rates and a record of good wage job placements for the local employers looking for trained and certified employees. I cannot understand the reluctance of past governors to look at what works based on proven graduation rates but also on proven job placements taking into consideration the wage rates paid after rigorous certified job training programs. Ask your candidates for governor about the issue of allowing the Tennessee Promise money to go where it produces provable results. So much money is now being wasted on workforce development programs that hand out worthless certifications for low paying jobs. To be somebody you have to study and train to do something needed in the real world of available high paying jobs. A worthless certificate after minimal training does not fill the bill.