Archive for the ‘budget’ Category

Downtown, Memphis In May and Mud Island

Tuesday, July 30th, 2019

July 30, 2019

 

Downtown, Memphis In May and Mud Island

 

I have lived in Memphis all my life, born and raised here and love the City. It is beautiful, livable and poised for a great future. I worked for over 40 years in the downtown area (south Memphis) and ate lunch downtown several times a week.

 

After retirement I do not go downtown as much as I used to. However I went downtown recently on a visit to look at the areas that are now in active dispute, Tom Lee Park and Mud Island. In the interest of full disclosure, I have children who actively participate in the barbecue festival, and they love it.

 

I drove down Poplar and went to the Mud Island parking area over the bridge and around the circle. I noted the huge number of apartments on my left as I drove south to Mud Island. I first saw the structure shown below and wondered what is was. I was later told it was the structure that used to hold the Memphis Belle World War II famous bomber which is now at Wright Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton Ohio.

http://www.memphisshelbyinform.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/IMG_0363-1.pdf

 

 

Then I drove on to the parking area which had many warning signs that I had to pay to park and I only had to text a number and then enter another number to pay. I eventually just parked and said the hell with it and walked to the entrance to the park.

It was a beautiful day and there were a few kids and parents and no problem with crowds. I was amazed at the beautiful buildings that comprise the park and how much money we have spent on this investment. It is beautiful, unique and totally underutilized. What is the solution?

 

My immediate thought is why not build a parking facility where the Memphis Belle structure is to make visits easier. Provide golf cart type electric vehicles for those who do not want to walk. Put casual eating and drinking facilities along the way with views of the river. For elegant dining reopen the beautiful restaurant that is already there. Repair the tram that I understand is now inoperative. The key is making it easy and fun for people to come and enjoy Mud Island and the river.

 

But there is possibly a problem and that is the split between north and south Memphis. The dividing line is Monroe and Front. In my Father’s Day as he grew up in South Memphis he said it was worth your life to cross Poplar and date a young North Memphis lady. He survived and so will we.

 

After my visit to Mud Island I drove down to Tom Lee Park and noted the wasted investment in the riverboat landing with its red ugly circular spiral and money losing useless restaurant. Surely we can come up with a plan that unites south and north downtown Memphis interests and allows the Barbeque festival and Beale Street interests to prosper and also bring back the large Mud Island investment to its initial bright goals without bankrupting our great City.

What is the difference between a garbage can and a recycle bin?

Wednesday, July 3rd, 2019

What is the difference between a garbage can and a recycle bin?

July 2, 2019

Recently I sent an open records request to the City of Memphis asking them for the following information.

“What is the total poundage of recycle material for the last 3-month period picked up by the City? How much of this has been recycled and how much has gone into the general landfill? How has the recycled material been disposed of?”

About a month later I got a message that the requested information was not available, and my open records request was closed.

Most Memphis and Germantown residents have a garbage can and a recycle bin which is picked up by the cities. But because of international situations and economic factors, recyclable material properly collected is no longer marketable. Therefore, my question is what is happening to the material that has been collected as recycle material?

Most people want to do the right thing and do not want to litter our world and our city with trash. What can be done with our garbage that makes sense?

As for myself I put mostly the following items into my garbage and recycle bins.

  • Soft drink bottles, mineral water and fruit juice containers made from PETE plastic (polyethylene terephthalate)
  • Milk jugs, cleaning agents, laundry detergents, shampoo, washing and shower soap bottles, HDPE plastic (high density polyethylene).
  • Shopping bags, highly resistant sacks and wrappings made from LDPE plastic (low-density polyethylene)
  • There are other plastics such as PP (polypropylene, furniture, luggage toys etc) and such items as nylons and Fiberglas.

The 2 items I see the most of that are not recyclable are PS (polystyrene, carryaway food containers) and PVC (polyvinyl chloride, plastic packaging, bubble foil and food foils to wrap foodstuff). They are light weight, but they take up a lot of space in the garbage can.

What are other cities doing with this recycle problem? Here if some information from a recent article.

 

Philadelphia is now burning about half of its 1.5 million residents’ recycling material in an incinerator that converts waste to energy. In Memphis, the international airport still has recycling bins around the terminals, but every collected can, bottle and newspaper are sent to a landfill. And last month, officials in the central Florida city of Deltona faced the reality that, despite their best efforts to recycle, their curbside program was not working and suspended it. Those are just three of the hundreds of towns and cities across the country that have canceled recycling programs, limited the types of material they accepted or agreed to huge price increases.

 

What are Memphis and Germantown doing? The citizens in Shelby County need an answer to what is currently going on with our garbage and recycle material as the public wants to help keep our cities beautiful and clean. Does anyone have more information? I would like to know.

Equity-Focused Operations “At What Cost?”

Tuesday, March 12th, 2019

Equity-Focused Operations “At What Cost?”

 

Ms Tami Sawyer announced that she will be a candidate for Memphis Mayor this year. She is currently a Shelby County commissioner. I wish her luck and she will no doubt be a formidable candidate. But let us look at what she says.

“My administration will be one that is set on equity,” Sawyer said on the podcast. “All of the operations that come out of City Hall will be equity-focused. That’s how you get to that shift. You put leaders in place who share your vision, who believe equity and opportunity are required in all parts of the city.”

Ms Sawyer points out that Mayor Strickland has publicized the jump in city spending with minority- and women-owned businesses from 12 percent to 24 percent since 2016. Despite that increase, Sawyer called the current figures “staggeringly low,” and said that spending should be more closely aligned with Memphis’ demographic makeup.

“What I want to see is a number that’s closer to the 70 percent,” she said. “That’s what we’re shooting for.”

The only interpretation is that all city and county contracts and spending will not be based on lowest and best price but on the basis of minority and women owned credentials regardless of cost.

I have been calling for some time for a change in City and County purchasing procedures. It is very difficult to bid on city and county purchasing contracts as the paperwork is complex. But what is missing is open access to competitive bids and the cost of minority preferences. We currently do not know what minority preferences are costing taxpayers. We are entitled to know how much extra we are paying for these rules and purchasing ratios. Therefore, the City and County should show on each bid the other bidders on each contract and if the low bidder did not get the contract, we should know why and the cost differential. Also, each contract should display the minority percentage of the contract and what minority received the contract.

I have railed against this minority spending requirement for several years. I am not against economically disadvantaged minorities getting a leg up. However what should be changed is the following. The paperwork and legal qualification rules are very complicated and discourage otherwise qualified firms. There should be a common-sense method such as the better business bureau or other independent organization that gives a rating system based on customer satisfaction reports.

Most importantly the purchasing system should be open and transparent with the final bids and selection on line and open to all. If a minority firm is the low bidder, so be it. If it is not the low bidder and is selected, then the price differential should be no more than 3% to 5% and then the minority firm should be given a one to two-year time to graduate to a no price differential status for future competitive bids. The system now is not transparent, and we do not know what minority spending rules are costing us and we do not know who the beneficiaries are.

What MS Sawyer is proposing is the distribution of taxpayer funds on the basis of race or gender preferences. That always leads to friends of the politicians getting the bulk of the pie without any benefit to the public.

What are your thoughts on this subject?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ms Tami Sawyer announced that she will be a candidate for Memphis Mayor this year. She is currently a Shelby County commissioner. I wish her luck and she will no doubt be a formidable candidate. But let us look at what she says.

“My administration will be one that is set on equity,” Sawyer said on the podcast. “All of the operations that come out of City Hall will be equity-focused. That’s how you get to that shift. You put leaders in place who share your vision, who believe equity and opportunity are required in all parts of the city.”

Ms Sawyer points out that Mayor Strickland has publicized the jump in city spending with minority- and women-owned businesses from 12 percent to 24 percent since 2016. Despite that increase, Sawyer called the current figures “staggeringly low,” and said that spending should be more closely aligned with Memphis’ demographic makeup.

“What I want to see is a number that’s closer to the 70 percent,” she said. “That’s what we’re shooting for.”

The only interpretation is that all city and county contracts and spending will not be based on lowest and best price but on the basis of minority and women owned credentials regardless of cost.

I have been calling for some time for a change in City and County purchasing procedures. It is very difficult to bid on city and county purchasing contracts as the paperwork is complex. But what is missing is open access to competitive bids and the cost of minority preferences. We currently do not know what minority preferences are costing taxpayers. We are entitled to know how much extra we are paying for these rules and purchasing ratios. Therefore, the City and County should show on each bid the other bidders on each contract and if the low bidder did not get the contract, we should know why and the cost differential. Also, each contract should display the minority percentage of the contract and what minority received the contract.

I have railed against this minority spending requirement for several years. I am not against economically disadvantaged minorities getting a leg up. However what should be changed is the following. The paperwork and legal qualification rules are very complicated and discourage otherwise qualified firms. There should be a common-sense method such as the better business bureau or other independent organization that gives a rating system based on customer satisfaction reports.

Most importantly the purchasing system should be open and transparent with the final bids and selection on line and open to all. If a minority firm is the low bidder, so be it. If it is not the low bidder and is selected, then the price differential should be no more than 3% to 5% and then the minority firm should be given a one to two-year time to graduate to a no price differential status for future competitive bids. The system now is not transparent, and we do not know what minority spending rules are costing us and we do not know who the beneficiaries are.

What MS Sawyer is proposing is the distribution of taxpayer funds on the basis of race or gender preferences. That always leads to friends of the politicians getting the bulk of the pie without any benefit to the public.

What are your thoughts on this subject?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recycle Standards-Memphis and Germantown

Tuesday, January 15th, 2019

01/15/2019

I was all set to publish an informative article about how to distinguish between those items that are recyclable and those which go into the trash and landfill. I then read the article about China no longer buying our recyclable items and the effects of that decision. Then the City of Memphis announced that its recycle contract with Republic Services is in question because Republic wants to to charge Memphis for taking recyclable materials rather than pay Memphis something. Germantown pays about $62 per ton for their materials. The whole recycle question is no longer a holier than thou virtue, it has becomes “how much you are willing to pay at the CHURCH OF RECYCLE VIRTUE”. We must have a public discussion about this subject and see if we can come to a solution that we can afford and still pay homage to our desire for a clean and waste free world. There is a question that I ask. “Is our recyclable material really being recycled or is it going into the general landfill? I really don’t know.

BELOW IS MY POST THAT I INTENDED TO PUBLISH BEFORE I BECAME AWARE OF THE CITY OF MEMPHIS SITUATION.

Following is the City of Memphis reply to my open records request asking them to compare their recycle policy to the City of Germantown.

 

Dear Joe Saino,

 

The City received a public records request from you on 12/29/2018. Your request mentioned “The following is the City of Germantown standards for recycling. Does the City of Memphis agree with this standard and if not what are the differences with the standard and additions, deletions or corrections.

Germantown stated: The following items can be recycled:
Due to the collection process, all recycling materials must be placed inside the roll cart. Any materials outside of the cart will be collected as household trash.

Mixed paper products: newspaper, magazines, brochures, paper bags, paper towel rolls, paper back books, cartons, greeting cards, regular and junk mail, cardboard beverage carriers, phone books, office paper, catalogs, paperboard boxes and file folders.
Corrugated cardboard containers, flattened and cut to no more than 3 feet by 2 feet
Non-corrugated cardboard commonly used in dry food and cereal boxes, shoe boxes and other similar packaging
Glass bottles and jars – no lids (empty and rinse)
#1, #2, #4, #5 and #7 plastic food and beverage containers –including bottles, jars, jugs and other rigid plastic containers.
PETE, HDPE, PVC, LDPE and PP
Aluminum and metal food cans without lids
Aluminum beverage cans (empty and rinse)
Foil and foil trays clean of food
Empty juice boxes, soup and milk cartons (empty and replace cap)
Large Cardboard Containers
The City has a cardboard recycling container located at Economic and Community Development, 1920 South Germantown Road, available for all city residents to recycle large cardboard. All cardboard must be flattened.

The following items cannot be recycled:

#3 and #6 plastics – including plastic bags, plastic film, tubs and pots
Foam egg cartons
Styrofoam
Food or liquid (no garbage)
Clothing or linens
Tanglers, hoses, chains, electronics or batteries
Big items (wood, plastic, furniture or metal)
Some items not collected for recycling by the City can be recycled at these convenient area locations:

Plastic grocery bags – A majority of local grocery store locations
Printer cartridges – Office Depot locations, receive a credit on a future purchase; cartridges refilled at local Walgreens locations
Batteries, including car, cell phone, camcorder and rechargeable batteries – Batteries Plus, 465 North Germantown Parkway
Cell phones – AT&T locations, at Verizon locations or visit Verizon online recycling program or visit cellphonesforsoldiers.com
IPods – Apple Store, Saddle Creek
Used motor oil – Germantown Public Works Complex, 7700 Southern Avenue
Clothing, furniture and household items – Non-profit agencies or garage sale
Wire hangers – Some dry cleaners accept used hangers for reuse
Used electronics can be taken to the semiannual Amnesty Dumpster and Recycling Day”

 

Here is the City of Memphis reply.

The City has reviewed its files and has located responsive records to your request. Per the custodian: The City of Memphis’ recycling program includes all plastics except plastic films and bags and Styrofoam (which includes the black food containers at Trezevant Manor and the egg cartons which are “foam” (Styrofoam) products). We even accept plastic outdoor patio chairs, “all plastic” constructed toys. The plastic containers used at the salad bar at Trezevant are recyclable, but must be rinsed to remove any food residue.

We accept aluminum and steel cans; aluminum foil and the associated foil cooking containers; all paper that are not food tainted; glass bottles and jars (no lids); plastic bottles and jars with lids attached; and aseptic  juice, milk, soup, and vegetable cartons (found at stores like Whole Foods).

If Mr. Saino follows the Germantown rules he will be in compliance with our regulations, however, we do accept more items than Germantown.

These two standards seem to answer most questions. It seems that #3 PVC (polyvinyl chloride) [trays for sweets, fruit, plastic packing (bubble foil and food foils to wrap the foodstuff] and #6 (polystyrene) [toys, hard packing, refrigerator trays, cosmetic bags, costume jewelry, CD cases, vending cups] are the main common items that cannot be recycled.

If you disagree with the above, I would love to hear from you with examples. It does take some work and thought to work towards a future where we try to recycle as much as possible.

 

The Inconvenient World Of Convenience

Wednesday, December 19th, 2018

December 17, 2018

The Inconvenient world of convenience

 

This is a follow up to my post “Plastic Bag Tax” on my website, www.memphisshelbyinform.com.

 

I consider myself to be a typical American, used to convenience in almost everything. I buy plastic water bottles rather than carry around a heavier metal insulated container. I buy plastic soft drink bottles, plastic yogurt containers, plastic throw away food containers. Am I a bad person? I will leave that question to my wife and children.

 

Basically, I consider that I am woefully uninformed about recycling. So, I started digging for information about the whole area of what happens when I throw those bottles, containers and other items into my garbage pail.

 

I started at my computer to see what information was available. The main points that I discovered was as follows.

 

  • The use of plastics in packaging has undergone a revolution. These very smart chemical scientists have taken petrochemicals and transformed them into various chemical stocks such as POLYETHYLENE TEREPHTHALATE, HIGH-DENSITY POLYETHYLENE, POLYVINYL CHLORIDE, LOW-DENSITY POLYETHLENE, POLYPROPYLENE, POLYSTYRENE, AND OTHER PLACTICS INCLUDING ACRYLICS, POLYCARBONATE, POLYACTIC FIBERS, NYLON AND FIBERGLAS. OUCH!! No wonder I hated chemistry in school.
  • China used to take most of our recycled products but in January of this year they stopped accepting recyclables from many countries.
  • Locally the City of Memphis is in a time of transformation as are other local municipalities like Germantown. Where recyclables used to pay for itself, it now appears we will have to pay more in the future.

 

Therefore, my job now is to educate myself as to what is recyclable and what is not and what can I do to help solve or mitigate the problem.  First job is to identify items. The following chart is basic to all the chemicals mentioned above.

 

 

I asked the City of Memphis thru an open records request the following.

“I would like information on which of these 7 symbols which appear on a lot of products you will accept for recycling here in Memphis. Also, if you have other suggestions or standards for identification of acceptable products symbols, I would like to have them by email return.”

Here is their answer.

The City has reviewed its files and has located responsive records to your request. Per the custodian, size does matter. Straws, plastic picnic utensils, and pill bottles are too small to be sorted accurately. Also – recycling needs to be clean. If plastic plates have lingering food debris attached, then they can actually contaminate the load. The plastic items we collect must just be all plastic. If they contain metal parts or electronic panels then they are not recyclable. To easily identify plastics we accept, visit memphisrecycles.com or check the top of your City of Memphis gray recycling cart. You will find a complete list of the plastics, paper, metals, glass and cartons you can recycle in Memphis. Thank you for participating in our curbside recycling program. 

This answer seems to address most items I come across in my daily life. The plastic bags that are at checkout at Kroger and some other stores still is the object of a possible charge before the City Council. Under the plan, consumers would pay 7 cents for each plastic bag they use to carry their purchases from Memphis retailers sized 2,000 square feet or greater. The Memphis bag tax proposal would funnel 2 cents to the grocers as a handling fee, while the city would pull in the other 5 cents per bag. People age 65 and older, and those who use Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits or other public assistance, would be exempt city councilman Boyd said.

 

What did I learn? The City is doing the right thing and seems to be on top of the huge problem of our throwaway society. Of the seven chasing arrow symbols it seems that #6 (POLYSTYRENE) is a big problem and cannot currently be recycled without a lot more research. #3 (POLYVINYL CHLORIDE) and #4 (LOW DENSITY POLYETHLENE) are also questionable. I have found that many items do not have the 1 thru 7 symbols. You  have to use some judgement.

There is a lot of research going on in this are and here is an recent article that you might find interesting. Possibly the wonderful world of chemistry will solve this problem.

 

I would love to hear from you on your experience in this throwaway society.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plastic Bag Tax-Are You For It? Is It Necessary? Will It Solve The Plastic Pollution Problem?

Monday, November 26th, 2018

November 26, 2018

 

Plastic Bag Tax-Are You For It? Is It Necessary? Will It Solve The Plastic Pollution Problem?

This proposal caught my attendance and is something that has been on my mind for some time. When I go to my local Kroger store, I always use the plastic bags to my shame. I could easily use my large canvas bag instead, but I don’t.

Under the plan, consumers would pay 7 cents for each plastic bag they use to carry their purchases from Memphis retailers sized 2,000 square feet or greater.

“This isn’t about revenue to the city of Memphis, this is about sustainability and protecting our waterways,” City Council chairman Berlin Boyd said Tuesday, pitching the plastic bag tax during the council’s public works, transportation and general services committee.

The Memphis bag tax proposal would funnel 2 cents to the grocers as a handling fee, while the city would pull in the other 5 cents per bag. People age 65 and older, and those who use Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits or other public assistance, would be exempt, Boyd said.

Then I did some research and here is an article that I think frames the great problem of plastic pollution. Read it for background info.

 

Here are some pictures I took at my local Kroger store in the last few days.

customer with plastic water bottles

 

rows after row of plastic soda bottles

 

 

stacks of plastic water bottles

 

 

It I obvious that the problem is more than just the plastic bags at grocery store checkout. However the proposal for a 7 cent tax on each plastic bag is a good start. The only thing that seems to work is a financial stimulus to get the public’s attention.

 

The real solution to the plastic container problem is inventing a material that can do the job that the present materials do but with the medium- and long-term characteristic of being able to dissolve into the earth with no harmful effects. Otherwise we will have to depend on financial incentives to make the public help us KEEP MEMPHIS BEAUTIFUL.

 

If any reader has thoughts on this subject, I would certainly love to hear them.

 

 

 

 

Amazon and Nashville/Memphis

Monday, November 19th, 2018

Now that the election is over, let us get back to important things like comparing Memphis/Shelby County to Nashville/Davidson County.

We have the news that Nashville is getting a piece of the Amazon pie, 5000 high paying jobs. It comes at a high taxpayer price but is probably worth it. Why Nashville and not Memphis?

Comparing Nashville to Memphis has been a project for me for some time. It is not easy to go through all the published financial data and come up with understandable comparison data. However, let us start with a few facts.

Population: Shelby County: 936,961, Davidson County: 691,243

Population of the core city: Memphis 653,236, Nashville 444,297

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Area: Shelby County: 755 sq. miles, Davidson County: 525 sq. miles

Area of the core city: Memphis, 324 sq. miles, Urban Nashville, 198 sq. miles, general service area 327 sq. miles for a total of 525 square miles.

Conclusion: population density of core city Memphis 2016/sq. mile

Population of core city Nashville 2243/sq. mile

—————————————————————————————————–

Property tax revenue: Memphis $458,671,000, Shelby County $793,849,000 for a total of $1,252,520,000 or 1.25 billion.

Property taxes, Nashville Metro, $971,643,000.

——————————————————————————————————–

Budget of Memphis and Shelby County $1.88 billion.

Budget of Metro Nashville $2.23 billion.

Budget expenditures per resident Memphis and Shelby County $2006

Budget expenditure per resident of Metro Davidson $3226

——————————————————————————————————–

Debt service as a % of operating expenditures

Metro Nashville                  9%

Memphis                               20%

Shelby County                     21.45%

——————————————————————————————————

Memphis pension liability 2018- $2.68 billion 89.6% funding ratio

Shelby County pension liability 2017- $1.2 billion 71% funding ratio

Nashville Metro pension liability 2017- 3.08 billion 95.4% funded

 

Memphis OPEB liability 2018 $334 million, 0.8% funded

Shelby County OPEB liability 2017 $232 million 83.3% funded

Nashville Metro OPEB liability $2.33 billion, zero % funded

Typical Winter utility bill

Memphis- $244.10

Nashville- $375.65

————————————————————————————————————-

The Statement of Net Position presents information on all the Government’s assets, deferred outflows of resources, liabilities, and deferred inflows of resources, with the difference reported as net position. Over time, increases or decreases in net position may serve as a useful indicator of whether the financial position of the Government is improving or deteriorating.

 

Metro Nashville net position decreased by $266 million for the year ending 2017.

Memphis net position decreases by $58 million for the year ending 2017.

Shelby County net position increased by $86 million for the year ending 2017

 

If you have additional financial comparison information or disagree with any of the above information, please let me know.

 

————————————————————————————————————-

 

I think Memphis is a great city, beautiful trees, weather is consistently great, wonderful  people and compared to Nashville, a low cost of living. What is the difference?

 

EDUCATION AND TRAINED WORK FORCE.

 

We are told that these 5000 jobs Amazon will bring to Nashville have an average salary of $150,000/year. These are jobs that require high tech skills in management, engineering, computer science and programming. It is a pleasure to go to the Amazon website as its ease of use is outstanding and much better than its competitors.

 

However, Amazon’s main business is selling things made by others and getting those things to you fast and at a low cost.

 

Memphis needs to compete in the area of technical job training and skills that are needed in the next few years in manufacturing, health care, auto and aircraft maintenance, warehousing and transportation. Our new governor has promised to continue free junior college training (Tennessee Promise) and hopefully he will allow qualified non-profits like our local Moore Tech College to participate in the Tennessee Promise program.

 

Our local shortage of trained people needed by companies like Amazon will not be solved in a few years but while we upgrade our primary grade education, we need to emphasize trade school education to upgrade our local working wage level and reduce our comparative high poverty level.

 

I would appreciate your thoughts on what we can do to help Memphis to reach the next level of prosperity. Memphis is great, but we can make it grow and prosper with the right education policies. EDUCATION IS THE ANSWER.

 

 

 

 

 

I Voted Yesterday and Then Cleaned Out My Closet. What a Surprise!!

Thursday, October 25th, 2018

October 26, 2018

 

I voted yesterday and then cleaned out my closet. What a surprise!!

 

After hearing all the NO-NO-NO advertising and NO-YES-NO and NO-YES-YES on social media I fully expected to see NO! and YES! on the ballot. WRONG!!

 

What was on the ballot was “Vote For the Amendment or Against the amendment. I saw several voters talking to the election commission staff asking for an explanation. This is another example of the poor wording of these three ordinances. We will have to wait until November 6th or 7th to see the results. Will it be AGAINST-AGAINST-AGAINST or AGAINST-FOR-FOR or something else.

 

Then I went home and started cleaning out my closet and came across the following sign from 2008 when Memphis voters put term limits in place for the Memphis Mayor and Memphis City Council members, limiting each to two consecutive 4 year terms in office. None of our group shown in the picture were elected but the influence of 30,000 taxpayers paid off with the charter commission imposing two consecutive four year term on the Mayor and the City Council as was already the case for the County Mayor and the County Commission. The City Council at that time fought us tooth and nail but we won. Now both the Memphis City Council and the County Commission want to get 12 consecutive years rather than 8. Vote Against.

 

 

 

In the 2008 vote, more than three-quarters of Memphis voters approved the two-term limit.

 

Yesterday, on the second and third items I voted FOR and FOR.

 

Vote your conviction but please vote.

 

 

 

The True Facts About IRV Voting

Tuesday, October 16th, 2018

October 16, 2018

 

I recently sent out an email and posted information on my website (www.memphisshelbyinform.com) giving my recommendation to vote NO-YES-YES on the three ordinances at the end of the upcoming ballot.

 

I then received an email from City Councilman Edmund Fore Jr. as shown below.

Mr. Saino,

I hope this message finds you in good health and spirit.

We disagree on many things, but I will say that you are spot on regarding these items. In fact, IRV has been repealed in several cities due to costs and the number of exhausted ballots that are thrown out. Taking to the local Comptroller, Shelby County would have to pay up to $6.3 million for new machines.

I would be glad to provide more information, as the local media has refused to give the public both sides.

I appreciate your attempt to educate the people, even when we disagree.

 

He also sent me to a website (www.yes2repeal.org)  and if you will look at the video on this site it explains the faults in Instant Runoff Voting (IRV) and he also sent me the document that you can read explaining the true cost and impediments of IRV. Enough said. Early voting starts tomorrow and please get out and vote and vote NO-YES-YES.

NO-YES-YES

Saturday, October 13th, 2018

October 15, 2018

 

Elections Are Coming and there are three interesting charter questions at the end of the ballot. There is a push by a local group. They are pushing for Instant Runoffs. The three items are written in a very confusing manner making it difficult to understand. I hope to make it simple.

 

ORDINANCE 5676 ASKS   VOTERS TO EXTEND TERMS LIMITS FROM 2 FOUR YEAR TERMS TO 3 FOUR YEAR TERMS. Our history of politicians hoping to get their pensions expanded as they did in 2001 with the pension resolution at the City of Memphis allowing elected and appointed officials to retire after 12 years regardless of age is an example of the need for terms limits. VOTE NO!!.

 

ORDINANCE 5669 ASKS VOTERS TO REPEAL INSTANT RUNOFF VOTING. Instant runoff voting was approved in 2008 without a lot of research and sold as a means to save money by not having runoff elections. Runoff elections are only required in the 7 single member Memphis city council districts. They are not required for the Shelby County 13 Shelby County Commission districts. The money that the proponents say will be saved varies depending on who you talk to. What will happen is confusion, delay, new equipment purchases necessary to implement a paper trail. MY RECOMMENDATION IS TO VOTE YES AND AFTER IRV IS KILLED, to go back to the court and get approval to elect the seven single member City Council members with plurality voting as is done in the 3 super districts and all 13 Shelby County districts. VOTE YES!!

 

ORDINANCE 5677 ASKS VOTERS TO AMEND THE CHARTER TO PROVIDE THAT THE CANDIDATE RECEIVING THE LARGEST NUMBER OF VOTES SHALL BE DECLARED THE WINNER, THEREBY ELIMINATING RUN-OFF ELECTIONS. VOTE YES OR NO!! If you vote NO we will still require runoff elections which is OK. If you vote YES we will probably have to go back to court to reverse the 1991 decision which required a majority vote and sometimes generated a runoff election. But if the court grants a reversal, there will be no need for instant runoff elections and its confusion and high costs. VOTE YES!!

 

 

There is a very important election coming up on Tuesday November 6th, 2018. Let us look at some of the important elections.

A new Tennessee Governor will be elected as our current governor is term limited. I am voting for Bill Lee.

 

Another important election is the United States Senate because of the retirement of our current senator, Bob Corker. I am voting for Marsha Blackburn.

 

Another important election is the District 8 United States House of Representatives and I recommend voting for David Kustoff. In my district I am voting for Charlotte Bergmann.

 

I am in Tennessee Senate District 31 and will be voting for Brian Kelsey.

 

I am in Tennessee House of Representative District 93 and there is no Republican running, so I will not be voting on this district.  I used to vote in District 83 and if I was still there I would vote for Mark White.

 

I have listed a complete ballot with my choices listed in red. Vote your convictions but please vote.

 

 

 

Sample Ballot
State and Federal General Election & Municipal Elections
 
General Election
 

 

Your ballot will contain four or five State and Federal races depending upon where you live. All ballots will have the race for Governor and US Senate. All ballots will have the correct district for the US House of Representatives and the Tennessee House of Representatives. Voters who live in Tennessee Senate District 29, 31, and 33 will have the correct race for their district on their ballots. Voters who live in Tennessee Senate District 30 and 32 will not see a Tennessee Senate race on their ballots since those districts will not be on the ballot until 2020.

 

State and Federal Offices

Governor of Tennessee Bill Lee Republican BILL LEE
Vote for One Karl Dean Democratic
Mark CoonRippy Brown Independent
Sherry L. Clark Independent
Justin Cornett Independent
Gabriel Fancher Independent
Sean Bruce Fleming Independent
William Andrew Helmstetter Independent
Cory King Independent
Matthew Koch Independent
Tommy Ray McAnally Independent
Jessie D. McDonald Independent
Toney Randall Mitchell Independent
Yvonne Neubert Independent
Alfred Shawn Rapoza Independent
Chad Riden Independent
Robert Sawyers Sr. Independent
Heather Scott Independent
George Blackwell Smith IV Independent
Jeremy Allen Stephenson Independent
Tracy C. Yaste Tisdale Independent
Mike Toews Independent
Rick Tyler Independent
Vinnie Vineyard Independent
Jaron D. Weidner Independent
Patrick Whitlock Independent
Joe B. Wilmoth Independent
Mark Wright Independent
United States Senate Marsha Blackburn Republican MARSHA BLACKBURN
Vote for One Phil Bredesen Democratic
Trudy A. Austin Independent
John Carico Independent
Dean Hill Independent
Kevin Lee McCants Independent
Breton Phillips Independent
Kris L. Todd Independent
United States House of Representatives District 8 David Kustoff

Erika Stotts Pearson James Hart

Republican This race will only appear if you live in US House of Representatives District 8.
Vote for One Democratic
Independent
United States House of Representatives District 9 Charlotte Bergmann Republican This race will only appear if you live in US House of Representatives District 9.
Vote for One Steve Cohen Democratic
Leo AwGoWhat Independent
Tennessee Senate District 29 Tom Stephens Republican This race will only appear if you live in TN Senate District 29.
Vote for One Raumesh Akbari Democratic
Tennessee Senate District 31 Brian Kelsey Republican This race will only appear if you live in TN Senate District 31.
Vote for One Gabby Salinas Democratic
 

Tennessee Senate District 33

 

Katrina Robinson

 

Democratic

This race will only appear if you live in TN Senate District 33.
Vote for One
Tennessee House of Representatives District 83 Mark White Republican This race will only appear if you live in TN House District 83
Vote for One Danielle Schonbaum Democratic
Tennessee House of Representatives District 84 Joe Towns Jr. Democratic This race will only appear if you live in TN House District 84.
Vote for One
Tennessee House of Representatives District 85 Jesse Chism Democratic This race will only appear if you live in TN House District 85.
Vote for One
Tennessee House of Representatives District 86 Barbara Cooper Democratic This race will only appear if you live in TN House District 86.
Vote for One
Tennessee House of Representatives District 87 Karen Camper Democratic This race will only appear if you live in TN House District 87.
Vote for One
Tennessee House of Representatives District 88 Larry J. Miller Democratic This race will only appear if you live in TN House District 88.
Vote for One
Tennessee House of Representatives District 90 John J. Deberry Jr. Democratic This race will only appear if you live in TN House District 90.
Vote for One
Tennessee House of Representatives District 91 London P. Lamar Democratic This race will only appear if you live in TN House District 91.
Vote for One
Tennessee House of Representatives District 93 G. A. Hardaway, Sr. Democratic This race will only appear if you live in TN House District

93.

Vote for One

 

Tennessee House of Representatives District 95 Kevin Vaughan Republican This race will only appear if you live in TN House District 95.
Vote for One Sanjeev Memula Democratic
Tennessee House of Representatives District 96 Scott McCormick Republican This race will only appear if you live in TN House District 96.
Vote for One Dwayne Thompson Democratic
Tennessee House of Representatives District 97 Jim Coley Republican This race will only appear if you live in TN House District 97.
Vote for One Allan Creasy Democratic
Tennessee House of Representatives District 98 Antonio Parkinson Democratic This race will only appear if you live in TN House District 98.
Vote for One
Tennessee House of Representatives District 99 Tom Leatherwood Republican This race will only appear if you live in TN House District 99.
Vote for One David Cambron Democratic
City of Bartlett
City of Bartlett Mayor John Lackey Non-Partisan
Vote for One A. Keith McDonald Non-Partisan
City of Bartlett Alderman – Position 1 W. C. “Bubba” Pleasant Non-Partisan
Vote for One
City of Bartlett Alderman – Position 2 Mitch Arnold Non-Partisan These races will only appear on your ballot if you live within the City of Bartlett
Vote for One Emily Elliott Non-Partisan
City of Bartlett Alderman – Position 3 David Parsons Non-Partisan
Vote for One
City of Bartlett SchoolBoard – Position 2 Erin Elliott Berry Non-Partisan
Vote for One
City of Bartlett School Board – Position 4 Bryan Woodruff Non-Partisan
Vote for One
Town of Collierville
Town of Collierville Alderman – Position 1 William Boone Non-Partisan
Vote for One Maureen J. Fraser Non-Partisan
Town of Collierville Alderman – Position 2 Billy Patton Non-Partisan
Vote for One
 

Town of Collierville Alderman – Position 4

 

Tom Allen

 

Non-Partisan

These races will only appear on your ballot if you live within the Town of Collierville.
Vote for One Gregory D. Cotton Non-Partisan
Town of Collierville School Board – Position 2 Wanda Chism Non-Partisan
Vote for One
Town of Collierville School Board – Position 4 Eelco R. Van Wijk Non-Partisan
Vote for One Frank Warren Non-Partisan
City of Germantown
City of Germantown Mayor John Barzizza Non-Partisan
Vote for One Mike Palazzolo Non-Partisan
City of Germantown Alderman – Position 1 Scott Sanders Non-Partisan
Vote for One Brian D. White Non-Partisan
 

City of Germantown Alderman – Position 2

 

Jeff Brown

 

Non-Partisan

These races will only appear on your ballot if you live within the Town of Germantown.
Vote for One Mary Anne Gibson Non-Partisan
City of Germantown School Board – Position 2 Brian Curry Non-Partisan
Vote for One Betsy Landers Non-Partisan
City of Germantown School Board – Position 4 Angela Rickman Griffith Non-Partisan
Vote for One Robyn Rey Rudisill Non-Partisan
City of Lakeland
City of Lakeland Mayor Wyatt Bunker Non-Partisan
Vote for One Mike Cunningham Non-Partisan
City of Lakeland Commissioner Jeremy Clayton Burnett Non-Partisan
Vote for up to two. Michele Dial Non-Partisan These races will only appear on your ballot if you live within the City of Lakeland.
Michael Green Non-Partisan
Richard A. Gonzales, Jr. Non-Partisan
Clark Plunk Non-Partisan
City of Lakeland School Board Zachary Coleman Non-Partisan
Vote for up to three. Kevin Floyd Non-Partisan
Laura Harrison Non-Partisan
Deborah Thomas Non-Partisan
City of Millington
City of Millington Alderman – Position 1 Bethany K. Huffman Non-Partisan
Vote for One
City of Millington Alderman – Position 2 Albert “AL” Bell Non-Partisan
Vote for One
City of Millington Alderman – Position 3 Jon Crisp Non-Partisan
Vote for One
City of Millington Alderman – Position 4 Larry Dagen Non-Partisan These races will only appear on your ballot if you live within the City of Millington
Vote for One

 

 

City of Millington School Board – Position 2

 

Marlon Evans

 

Non-Partisan

Vote for One Cecilia “C.J.” Haley Non-Partisan
City of Millington School Board – Position 4 Cody F. Childress Non-Partisan
Vote for One
City of Millington School Board – Position 5 Barbara Halliburton Non-Partisan
Vote for One Donald Holsinger Non-Partisan
City of Millington School Board – Position 6 Austin Brewer Non-Partisan
Vote for One Larry C. Jackson Non-Partisan
 

City of Memphis

These questions will only appear on your ballot if you live within the City of Memphis.

 

NO-YES-YES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

City of Memphis Ordinance #5676 Shall the Charter of the City of Memphis, Tennessee be amended to provide no person shall be eligible to hold or to be elected to the office of Mayor or Memphis City Council if any such person has served at any time more than three (3) consecutive four-year terms, except that service by persons elected or appointed to fill an unexpired four-year term shall not be counted as full four-year term?
Vote No
I, Doug McGowen, Interim Director of Finance for the City of Memphis do hereby certify that the foregoing amendment shall have no impact on the annual revenues and expenditures of the City.
 

City of Memphis Ordinance #5669

 

Shall the Charter of the City of Memphis, Tennessee be amended to repeal Instant Runoff Voting and to restore the election procedure existing prior to the 2008 Amendment for all City offices, and expressly retaining the 1991 federal ruling for persons elected to the Memphis City Council single districts?

Vote Yes
I, Brian Collins, Director of Finance for the City of Memphis do hereby certify that without speculating about certain assumptions I cannot estimate whether the foregoing amendment will have any impact on the annual revenues and expenditures of the City.
 

City of Memphis Ordinance #5677

 

Shall the Charter of the City of Memphis, Tennessee be amended to provide that in any municipal election held as required by law, the candidate receiving the largest number of votes shall be declared the winner, thereby eliminating run-off elections?

Vote Yes
I, Doug McGowen, Interim Director of Finance for the City of Memphis do hereby certify that the foregoing amendment shall have no impact on the annual revenues and expenditures of the City.