Archive for the ‘Beale Street’ Category

This and That About The Bicentennial Gateway Project

Monday, November 27th, 2017

This and That About The Bicentennial Gateway Project

 

I recently published the details about this huge proposed project but there were several unanswered questions that needed answers.

 

Here are the points that needed clarification and I pursued and got the answers.

 

On the list for original amounts spent for the presentation of this project was $518,270.97 paid to Stephen Schreiner & Renee Barrett. It turns out that that this amount was for the purchase of two pieces of property close to Bass Pro at 369 and 371 North Main.

Another question concerned the funding for this project which showed Annual Revenues from Land Leases of $297,000 the first year and a total of $3.7 million through 2031. The answer from the City of Memphis was the underlying assumption from the RKG report that the City might lease City-owned land to private entities, the specific land under consideration would be Mud Island. This is only an assumption, as no deal or structure has been developed for a project at this location.

Another question concerned the Brooks Museum of Art and the amount of support that the City of Memphis gives to the Brooks yearly. The City responded that in the FY 2016 net expenditures from the City to the Brooks was $571,448.00. I have attached the latest 990 form detailing the finances of the Brooks Museum. It basically depends on contributions from the City of Memphis and outside donors.

 

The other big factor is the type of bonds that are proposed to finance this and other similar projects like the Fairgrounds project. I am told they will be revenue bonds which generally mean that the City of Memphis, Shelby County and other governmental organizations with tax powers will not be on the hook if the project does not pay for itself on sales tax and property tax increasing revenues. Here is typical revenue bond language.

THE SERIES XXXX BONDS AND THE INTEREST THEREON DO NOT NOW AND SHALL NEVER CONSTITUTE A CHARGE AGAINST THE GENERAL CREDIT OR TAXING POWERS OF THE CITY, THE STATE OF TENNESSEE (THE “STATE”) OR ANY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION THEREOF WITHOUT LIMITATION, THE CITY, SHELBY COUNTY, TENNESSEE (THE “COUNTY”) and so on and so on.

So what this means, if it is revenue bond financing, that the bond buyer is at risk and will take the haircut if the income projections do not meet the projections. Hopefully they will and if so fine. If not, the bond holders suffer. However the reputation of the City will also suffer as it now happening in Puerto Rico and the City of Chicago and the state of Illinois and the City of Detroit in the past.

 

This downtown project and the Fairgrounds proposal needs a lot more discussion and disclosure. What are the risks and what are the rewards?

 

 

 

 

 

 

$281M Downtown Cultural Center And Now $160 M For The Fairgrounds

Wednesday, November 8th, 2017

$281M Downtown Cultural Center And Now $160 M For The Fairgrounds

 

I have to give the administration credit for thinking big. And it all will be paid, we hope, with money generated by tax incremental financing due to increased tourism sales taxes and state economic development funds.

The presentation on the downtown cultural center by the administration was well done and presented. I looked at the plan and wondered what had been spent so far for the well done concept work. So I asked the City to tell me what has been spent so far for this work. Here is their answer.

 

Original amounts for the Bicentennial Gateway development project.

# Vendor Original Amount

 33400 RKG Associates $40,000 and another $40,000 for Amendment #1

 33401 SR Consulting $250,000 and another $150,000 for Amendment #1

 33413 Bass, Berry and Sims $250,000

 33885 CH Johnson Consulting $20,000 and another $18,000 for Amendment #1

 34548 Glankler Brown $25,000

 34607 Archimania $128,325

 34619 Stephen Schreiner & Renee Barrett $518,270.97

That is a total so far that they have admitted to of $1.439 million.

I will pursue this further as we need to know what has been spent in addition to the above plus what has been spent on the fairgrounds planning so far. If you have additional questions and want further information let me know.

$281 Million For A Freshwater Aquarium And Downtown Cultural Center!!

Tuesday, October 24th, 2017

$281 Million For A Freshwater Aquarium And Downtown Cultural Center!!

 

Talk about an ambitious plan, this one takes the cake. Here are the details in a well presented and concise exhibit. The major elements of the proposed plan are as shown below.

  • Close Monroe between Front Street and Riverside Drive.
  • Create a new cultural center bounded by Union Avenue on the south, Front Street on the east, Riverside drive on west and the Cossitt Library on the north. This cultural center may become the relocation building for the Brooks Museum.
  • Build a pedestrian bridge going across Wolf River to Mud Island.
  • On Mud Island build a new 250 foot tall fresh water aquarium.
  • Upgrade the mosquito infested Mud Island Amphitheatre to something better suited to the outdoor concert business.

I must say I am impressed with the whole concept and plan. The Mud Island investment has been a failure as it never developed continuing attractions to draw people to come. It should have had bars and restaurants along the west side overlooking the river. I believe this was never done because it was opposed by the Beale Street interests. Also access to the island was limited to the north entrance.

Now as to the Brooks Museum. This is not mentioned in the plan but the CA article of October 18th said that this was a possibility. The Brooks Museum has a fine collection of art and much of it cannot be displayed as they do not have the space. Also there is a possibility this cultural center being the site for the William Eggleston collection, a world famous collection of photographs.

Now as to paying for this plan! The exhibit shows the cost and how it would be financed. Excluding the Pinch District Development and the Convention Center Renovation, the document projects a cost of $282 million.

  • Aquarium Museum $121 Million
  • River Park & Pedestrian Bridge $35 million
  • Cultural Center and Monroe Terrace $84 million
  • Fourth Bluff and Civic Commons $21 million
  • Riverfront Improvement $20 Million

For a total of about $282 million.

Basically they claim that it would be financed with the following items.

  • $100 million paid for by increases every year in incremental sales tax revenues in the expanded TDZ zone.
  • $74 million in net new sales taxes from sales of consumer goods.
  • $30 million in new aquarium sales taxes.
  • $7.3 million in sales taxes from the cultural center attendance and purchases.

 

  • $2.3 million from hospitality contribution (convention center hotels)
  • $3.7 million from land leases

The questionable items appear to be the projected growth of TDZ sales tax revenue and the amount of private equity and philanthropy that will be pledged to the project. The other item that occurs to me is the question of philanthropy. What will Bass Pro contribute to this project as Bass Pro seems to have a great upside when we are talking about a fresh water aquarium. After all they are in the business of fishing and hunting and if you look at what they spent on their Big Cedar Lodge near Branson Missouri, they certainly have a great upside in seeing this downtown Memphis project succeed.

The real big question is what has plagued past public projects. PROJECT PRICE CREEP!! As with other public projects (think Beale Street Landing) and with the difficulty of construction on the unstable riverfront and the necessity of building in an earthquake zone) can it be done at the projected cost?

What do you think about this big idea for downtown and Mud Island?

TDZ (Tourist Development Zone) Revenue Review

Tuesday, February 16th, 2016

February 16, 2016

TDZ (Tourist Development Zone) Revenue Review

I have been investigating the revenue flowing to the City of Memphis for the downtown TDZ zone which includes Bass Pro. This has been quite interesting and informative.

First I went to the State of Tennessee and got on their website that shows sales tax revenue sent to the City of Memphis for various items like state sales tax (the 7% sales tax), mixed drink tax and particularly the TDZ tax for the downtown tourist development zone. Here is the result of my investigation for the fiscal years ending June 30 of the years shown.

TDZ Zone, 7% state sales tax receipts TDZ Zone, 2-1/4% sales tax receipts Total sales tax receipts for year
2012 $12.1 million $1.1 million $13.2 million
2013 $12.7 million $1.6 million $14.3 million
2014 $12 million $1 million $13.1 million
2015 $16.8 million $3.6 million $20.5 million

 

Therefore 2015 shows an increase of over $7 million from 2014. This is indeed good news but where does it come from in the downtown TDZ? Bass Pro did not open its doors until May 2015 so it is not likely to account for the increase in sales taxes in 2 months of operation.

I asked the state of Tennessee about what businesses the sales taxes come from in the TDZ. They replied that state law does not allow them to give out that information as that would allow competitors to know the amount of sales from the various tax collecting businesses This restriction is reasonable.  Does the City of Memphis know or have a right to audit the sales figures? I do not know but I am sure the State of Tennessee has that right.  I called the Downtown Memphis Commission office and asked them where they thought the extra sales tax revenue was coming from. I have yet to receive their answer.

It will be interesting to see what happens in the future. There is a question about the Bass Pro contract concerning the rent which is based on 2% of sales. However there are questions about the 2% rent formula that will possibly not apply to leased facilities in Bass Pro. Also questions about the income from the elevator ride to the top being reduced by costs of employees and other restaurant and elevator expenses. This would reduce the 2% rent payment amount.

In any event, the news of the increase in TDZ revenue in the year ending June 30, 2015 is good news if correct. What are your thoughts?

ROI (Return On Investment)

Monday, February 8th, 2016

February 8, 2016

 

ROI (Return On Investment)

 

Recently I asked for the following information from the Riverfront Development Corporation.

 

I would like to know the final cost for the Beale Street Landing

 

I would like to have the most recent financial statement concerning the income and expense of the Landing operation showing income and expenses.

 

I would like to have the most recent annual financial statement for the RDC.

 

I received a prompt answer to these questions (with some delay due to my fault). You can look at the attached results.

 

They say the cost was $43.5 million with the Feds and State kicking $11.8 million, Housing and Community $1 million and the City $30.6 million. All of this is taxpayer money. Now we all recognize that parks, playgrounds, running and biking trails and other civic amenities do not pay a return on investment in a true business sense. However this restaurant/souvenir shop and boat landing should pay a better return than is shown by the landing operation income and expense sheet shown above. Except for the Foundation Corporate Grant of $75,000, it is losing money each month. Maybe the additional income generated by river boat tourists landings make up for some of this but could the landings have been done without this $43 million dollar project? Virginia McLean certainly thinks so. Here is what she told me recently.

 

Our new $43M taxpayer funded boat dock probably might make it easier (at the right water-levels) for passengers to board and has probably led to more business for our local daily excursion boat company, but I’m not absolutely certain about either of those points, and I can’t imagine that Beale Street Landing has had a serious impact on multi-state-city riverboat cruises.  The boat companies appear to be promoting Southern history, food, and music as draws for cruises on the Mississippi River. They dock at Natchez, Vicksburg, Helena, Paducah, to name a few, and those cities/towns don’t have expensive new boat docks. The boats appear to just tie up at the shore (like they still do here at Greenbelt Park when water levels are low ) or dock at historic landings like in St. Louis on the old landing which is adjacent & beneath the plaza the Arch sits on or at basic, simple open-air ticket-sale type places like in New Orleans’s Woldenberg Park. Personally I think Mud Island River Park’s landing would probably beat out anything, including Beale Street Landing. When the boats docked over there and if it was being run properly visitors would have had access to restaurants, a music, pretty park, amphitheater, and via monorail or skywalk downtown city by foot. 

 

I’ll stick with the idea that we didn’t really need it, couldn’t afford it, and now what do we do about running and maintaining it?  

 

The Mississippi River is our greatest asset but it is huge and powerful and maintaining anything on the river always ends up costing more than expected. The Beale Street Landing will continue to cost us in the future to maintain it. We do not need the Riverfront Development Corporation to guide and lead changes to Mud Island River Park considering their past history. What do you think?

Return On Investment

Monday, September 1st, 2014

September 2, 2014

 

Return On Investment

The City of Memphis pension board voted to change their investment strategy to raise their return on investment. I hope they are successful but they are taking a chance like the gambler at Tunica on the crap table. Seven come Eleven.

Look at this Asset Class Return Chart. These sectors rotate from very good to average to bad to very bad. Anyone that says they know what the future will be, will be very rich or very poor if they are risking their money. If they are risking someone else’s money, they will be very sorry but well paid for their advice.

Now here is what I would like to see. What is the return on the investment for the $43 million dollar development known as the Beale Street Landing? I went there a few days ago and below are some pictures. I would like to see a financial report on the return on investment for this structure. This is not like spending money for roads, sewer lines, parks, street lights, public safety and criminal justice. We must have that for a civilized society. CIMG1891But the Beale Street Landing must produce a return on the investment. Give us a report on RETURN ON INVESTMENT and a reason to continue to hire the high priced staff that brought us this investment. Here are some shots from our $43 million dollar investment. Parking $5.00 minimum, $15.00 maximum. Nice restaurant and bar with average lunch prices but they cannot get a professional restaurateur to operate it so they are running it themselves.  Hours, 9 AM to 4:30 PM Monday through Thursday, 9 to 7:30 on Friday, 11 to 7:30 on Saturday and 11 to 5 on Sunday. Where is the romantic nighttime supper watching the boats on the mighty Mississippi?

 

 

CIMG1880

 

 

CIMG1888

 

 

The Convention Center and Kevin Kane

Wednesday, December 4th, 2013

December 4, 2013

The Convention Center

I have been out of town visiting my daughter, son in law and grandson in San Francisco. It is a lovely town but not much fun getting there and returning by air from Memphis. I picked up a recent morning paper and found that the flights from Salt Lake to Memphis and back were being cut further. In past years there were nonstop flights from Memphis to San Francisco but now we have to fly to Timbuktu to get there and the price is out of sight.

 

I spent the first day back visiting with Kevin Kane, President and CEO of the Memphis Convention and Visitors Bureau. It was a pleasant visit and he is very knowledgeable about the Convention Center and visiting Memphis in general.

 

What I was after was the annual financial statements of the Cook Convention Center. I had tried to get these statements directly from the Convention Center office but either they were never in or they refused to answer calls. I had the June 30, 2007 financial statement but none later. The 2007 statement showed a loss of $3.5 million dollars.

 

After discussions with Kevin he promised me that he would get the 2008 through 2012 statements to me and that since 2007 the losses have been cut at the convention center. He sent the statements later and the 2012 loss at the Cook Convention Center was cut to $2.8 million dollars. We discussed the future of convention centers in general and the new costly one in Nashville and the old Cook Convention Center and the possibility of a new one for Memphis. He said that all convention centers lose money but the purpose is to develop tourism for the city and make money on tourism generated sales taxes and hotel, motel and car rental taxes. I speculated that internet advertising and electronic face to face meetings might eventually diminish convention trade but he contended that face to face meeting were still important.

 

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Memphis 2020 Growth Plan??

Thursday, September 12th, 2013

September 12, 2013

 

As I start reading through this massive document I have to start with the introduction and rationale of the plan. Here are the first 26 pages of the draft plan.

 

To be a successful urban area, Memphis has to do the following.

 

  • Increase property values
  • Decrease poverty
  • Ensure government efficiency
  • Improve neighborhoods
  • Invest in human capital
  • Grow the economy

 

Wow!! What great ideas. Why did I not think of those?

 

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Beale St And The 17 Boxes of Documents

Thursday, November 8th, 2012

November 8, 2012

There was an article in the Commercial Appeal last week concerning a court ruling on the ownership of Beale St. The judge ruled that Performa Entertainment Real Estate Inc., the company that has run the Beale Street Entertainment District since 1982, can assign its sublease to the city of Memphis.

 

This brings to mind that in 2006 I received a report that there were 17 boxes of Beale Street documents stored in a locked closet at Robert Lipscomb’s Office of (more…)

The Bluff City

Tuesday, December 13th, 2011